SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

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ABOUT

Churrasco Chicken, Bee-Bim Bop, Salmon Candy, Tourtière. Food feeds Canada's diversity. CuiZine: The Journal of Canadian Food Studies / Le journal des études sur l'alimentation au Canada nourishes intellectual exchanges on the subject of food in Canada from multicultural perspectives.

An integral aspect of ethnic identity and cultural production, food acts as a window into multiple cultural publics and thus lends itself to various interrogations through, for example, ethnography, history, material culture, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, religious studies, art history, communications, and environmental studies. CuiZine aims to provide an innovative academic forum for interdisciplinary discussions surrounding the diverse culinary cultures of Canada, while also providing a venue for dynamic creative content on the subject.

CuiZine encourages submissions that emphasize site-specific regional foodways across the country, whether it be an historical examination of first-generation Sri Lankan immigrant cooking in Toronto, a socio-economic study on the role of seal in Nunavut food culture, or a literary analysis of Duddy Kravitz's smoked meat escapades. At the same time, Canada's ethnic groups and cultural practices are not understood in isolation or as static phenomena. Rather, they evolve constantly and, in a nation of immigrants, interplay off each other. CuiZine hopes to foster this cross-cultural exchange by demonstrating the centrality of foodways to Canadian cultural identity.

CuiZine also serves as a creative outlet for food-themed written and visual pieces. Poetry and prose submissions should feed our minds, and aesthetic pieces should engage our senses.

A peer-reviewed e-journal hosted by McGill University, CuiZine accepts and publishes submissions in English and French.

Editor in Chief
Renée Desjardins


SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

CuiZine accepts only original unpublished work. Please do not submit anything that has previously appeared in print or online, in whole or in part, or that has simultaneously been submitted for publication elsewhere. If an article, poetry or prose work, or work of art is accepted for publication in CuiZine, the author agrees not to publish it elsewhere without written consent from the editor. Authors are responsible for obtaining reproduction permission for any copyrighted materials used in their own work.

The Editors reserve the right to use plagiarism detection software on any submitted material, including creative works. If we receive evidence that a manuscript has been plagiarized, the manuscript will be rejected. If the plagiarism was brought to our attention after a manuscript was published, the article will be removed from the journal archives immediately and permanently.


FORMAT OF SUBMISSIONS

Research Papers
CuiZine aims to build knowledge and understanding from disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and cross-sector perspectives. Our online format also supports submissions that incorporate images, audio, or video. Please send 2,500–3,500 word articles or 250-word abstracts in English or French, in paginated Word-readable format, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

Say It Like You Eat It
We feature selected food-themed original poetry, as well as creative fiction or nonfiction, with Canadian content or by a Canadian author. Please send full English or French submissions of no more than 2,000 words in paginated Word-readable format or PDF, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

CuiZineArt
CuiZine features food-themed online or digital pieces for visual consumption, such as animation, cartoon, or image-based essays with Canadian content or by a Canadian artist. We also welcome audio and video submissions. Please send full submissions or descriptions thereof in URL, PDF, JPEG, TIFF, or Word-readable format, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

Petites Madeleines
We invite food-themed reminiscences to engage CuiZine's core audience, that is, readers interested in Canada's diverse food culture. Please submit original unpublished works of no more than 2,000 words describing your food-related anecdotes, memories, and stories, together with a brief (50-word) biography, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

Iconic Foods
We publish short studies of iconic Canadian dishes or products, from butter tarts to beer. Submissions should explore the origins, evolution, and uniquely Canadian qualities—authentic or apocryphal—of a specific food or drink. Please send abstracts or full English or French submissions (of no more than 2,000 words) in paginated Word-readable format or PDF, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

Fresh from the Oven
We feature short opinion-editorial pieces exploring new ideas and issues in food studies. Please send abstracts or full English or French submissions of no more than 1,000 words in paginated Word-readable format or PDF, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

Interviews
We publish interviews with notable Canadian food personalities and experts. Please send proposals or full English or French submissions (of no more than 2,000 words) in paginated Word-readable format or PDF, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca. Submissions may include images, audio, or video footage.

Biographical Statements
Please provide a short (50-word) biographical statement with your submission, ideally in both English and French. Do not include funding information in your bio. You may provide this information in a separate "Acknowledgements" section.


REVIEWS

Book Reviews
We publish solicited reviews of recent food-related publications. Reviews should be approximately 750 words in length and should convey the most important elements of the book, including questions the book elicits but does not necessarily cover.

Exhibition Reviews
We publish reviews of recent Canadian food-related exhibitions and events. Reviews should be approximately 1,000 words in length and should convey the most important elements of the event, including questions it elicits but does not necessarily address. They should situate the event in the context of Canadian foodways study and scholarship. Images are highly recommended. Please send a short proposal, along with a CV, to: cuizine@ustboniface.ca.

Review Copies
We welcome review copies of recent food-related publications with Canadian content or by a Canadian author. Please send scholarly, creative (poetry, fiction, nonfiction), or culinary publications to CuiZine Book Reviews c/o Renée Desjardins at the mailing address below.


MAILING ADDRESS

Although email submissions are preferred, we will also accept paper submissions of articles, poetry and prose works, book reviews, and visual art pieces. For visual and multimedia submissions, we will also accept CDs, slides, videos, audio recordings, or photographs. Please mail submissions to:

Prof. Renée Desjardins
École de traduction - case 1
Université de Saint-Boniface
200, avenue de la Cathédrale
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2H0H7

Please do not send originals (CuiZine is not responsible for lost, misdirected, or damaged submissions).


STYLE GUIDELINES FOR RESEARCH PAPERS AND CREATIVE SUBMISSIONS

Language and Spelling
Please use Canadian spelling only (more specifically, the Canadian Oxford Dictionary).
Submissions may be written in French or English.
All foreign words (including French when in an English article and vice versa) in your paper should appear in italics and as they are spelled in their original language. If the original language does not use Latin script, please transliterate and italicize the foreign words.

Presentation and Formatting
All articles must be double spaced, left justified, and paginated with standard margins (one inch on all four sides).
Use 12-point Georgia font.
Leave a blank line between paragraphs, and do not indent the first line of each paragraph.
Fully indent and single-space all block quotations (quotations of four lines or more).

Punctuation
Use em dashes instead of en dashes. Please insert a space on either side of the em dash.
    On a Mac, hold down the shift key, followed by the option key, and press on the minus sign.
    On a PC, hold down the control key, followed by the alt key, and press on the minus sign.
Use only one space after punctuation (for example, following a period after a sentence).
Periods and commas should precede closing quotation marks.
"Scare quotes," indicating nonstandard or ironic usage of a word or phrase, should be used sparingly. When necessary, use double quotation marks rather than single ones.

Comma Usage
Use the serial comma. Example: vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry.
Use commas, not semicolons, to separate parts of a simple series following a colon.
Use a comma for introductory clauses, but not for short phrases (except to avoid ambiguity).
Favour periods over semicolons.

Do not use a comma after introductory words meaning
    when: tomorrow, yesterday, recently, early next week, in the morning
    how often: occasionally, often, frequently, once in a while
    where: here, in this case, at the meeting
    why: for that reason, because of this situation

Set off provinces, states, countries, years, and abbreviations following a person's name with commas.
    On a visit to Toronto, Ontario, we bought maple syrup. But on a visit to Ontario, we bought maple syrup.
    Both the Washington, D.C., and Montreal, Canada, airports were busy.
    Her death on October 29, 1988, was not an accident. But Her death, in October 1988, was not an accident.
    Bethany McCain, Ph.D., is giving the lecture.

Capitalization
Do not capitalize words following colons (except for subtitles).
Lowercase words derived from personal, national, or geographic names when using them in a nonliteral sense. Example: quixotic, brussels sprouts, india ink, swiss cheese.
Article titles, subtitles, and headings should be in bold text and capitalized in headline style. Example: Capitalize the First, Last, and All Other Major Words in the Title and Subtitles. (For more information on headline-style capitalization, see The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., sections 8.157, 8.158, and 8.159.)
(NB: Image and figure titles are treated differently; see below.)

Numbers
Spell out zero through nine and use numerals for 10 and above.
Spell out first through ninth centuries and use ordinals thereafter (10th century, 21st century). Do not use superscript.
Use numerals in the following cases:
    exact measurements (4.7 miles, 7.3 units)
    numbers as numbers (the number 6 is . . .)
    percentages (84 percent)
Write out and hyphenate basic fractions: one-sixteenth, two-thirds.
Large numbers: 15 million, 4 million, not 4,000,000 or four million.
Recast sentences that begin with numerals.
Use zero in open decimal fractions and for consistency: 0.2, 0.97, 6.35, and 6.90.
Use full page ranges: 246-251; 1,016-1,034.
Use en dashes in inclusive page and date ranges: 246-356, 2013-2014. (If you use from or between, do not use an en dash. From should be followed by to or through and between should be followed by and.)
Except for dates and years, use commas in numbers of four or more digits: 5,280 and 126,598.

Currency
Follow general number style (five pesos, 10 pesos).
Use numerals with familiar currency symbols: £5, $6.
Usage: $28 billion, not 28 billion dollars.

Date Ranges
Use full years in headings, chapter titles, map titles, and figure titles (1876-1893).
Use shortened date ranges in text (1879-93, but 1896-1907).
Usage: from 1487 to 1534, but during the period 1487-1534 or during the period 1477-88.

Dates
October 26, 1994, not 24 October, 1994, not October 24th, 1994 (unless in a title)
June 1988, not June of 1988, not June, 1988
January 1991, not Jan. 1991
Do not use an apostrophe in decades or centuries: 1970s, 1600s.
Do not abbreviate decades: 1970s, not 70s.

Abbreviations
In almost all cases, avoid the use of abbreviations in running text: spell out states, months of the year, and so on.
Use small caps for BCE (Before Common Era), CE (Common Era), AM, and PM.
Insert space between initials: A. S. Byatt, W. E. B. Du Bois.
Spell out acronymic terms the first time they are used, and insert the acronym in parentheses. In all subsequent mentions use only the acronym. Example: First mention of the Canadian Association of Food Studies (CAFS); thereafter, only CAFS.
Periods are only required for abbreviations containing lowercase letters, not those using all uppercase: NATO, PEI, MA, but Ph.D., et al., ibid.
Do not abbreviate decades: 1990s, not 90s or '90s; 1980s and 1990s, not 1980s and 90s.
In most cases, write out the full term, insert its abbreviation in parentheses, and use the abbreviation thereafter.
Avoid "e.g.," "i.e.," and "etc." in running text. Write in full (for example, . . .).

Hyphenations
Hyphenate adjectival forms when they precede the noun they are modifying: upper-class club, good-looking actor, 18th-century America, but the book is well researched.
Do not hyphenate adverbial modifiers ending in "ly": happily married man, carefully designed car.
Always hyphenate the following five prefixes: half-, self-, vice-, ex-, and quasi-.
Otherwise, do not hyphenate prefixes except when preceding a capitalized term or term with identical vowel: postwar, bimonthly, counterclockwise, overland, nonaligned, under financed, but post-Soviet, anti-imperialist, and pre-eminent.
Use an en dash if a compound term follows the prefix: pre–Civil War, post–Soviet Union.

Note on Possessive Forms
For possessive form, use: Henry James' novels, Wharton and James' style, Marx Brothers' humour, but Groucho Marx's comedy.

Images
Authors are responsible for obtaining all necessary permissions.

Image captions should be embedded within articles at the appropriate points, with numbers, description, and permissions information in square brackets.

Example: [Figure 1: Image description, Source Text, author, publisher, city, date. Source description. Photographic credit. Permissions information, museum reference number.]

Please submit images in one of the following file formats: JPEG, PNG, GIF, or BMP. We prefer not to receive PDF and DOC files with images only or files such as EPS, AI, or TIFF. The ideal image resolution is 150 dpi. Please do not send us images under 72 dpi.

Image files provided separately should be clearly labelled to correspond with in-text numbering. Example: [Figure 1: Caption] should match "1_filename.jpg."

Tables
Table numbers and titles should appear directly above the table, in normal (not bold) left-justified text, using sentence-style capitalization. Example: "Table 1: Descriptive title"

References to tables and figures within body of text should be spelled out and capitalized: ". . . as shown in Table 2"; "Body text (Figure 1)."

Recipes
Capitalize recipe names when referring to specific ones, but lowercase when referring to generic recipes. Example: my pecan pie, but my aunt's recipe for Peppy Pecan Pie.

Do not use quotation marks around recipe names. For more information, see The Chicago Manual of Style FAQ .

Documentation and References
Please use The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., for all documentation (more specifically, Chapter 14, "Documentation I: Notes and Bibliography").

CuiZine will publish only endnotes, and not bibliographies; therefore, please annotate accordingly. Note that the initial mention of an author must include both first and last names, in both text and endnotes.

For documentation guidelines, please see: The Chicago Manual of Style, Chapter 14.

For examples of book, journal, and web citations, please follow the "Notes" guidelines in the Citation Guide.

SPECIFIC GUIDELINES FOR BOOK REVIEWS

Please follow the general style guidelines above.
When reviewing one book, limit your word count to 750.
When reviewing two books, limit your word count to 1250.

For single-book reviews that only cite the reviewed book, simply include page references parenthetically within the text, with just the page number itself ("p," "pg," or "pp" are not necessary). Do not include the author's name, as it already appears in the heading.

For reviews of two or more books (and all single reviews that cite beyond the reviewed title), please follow The Chicago Manual of Style's documentation guidelines.

The review should be untitled, with the following information at the top of the piece:
Title
Author
Publishing house, year of publication
Number of pages (Example: 280 p.)

SPECIFIC GUIDELINES FOR "COOKING THE BOOKS" ENTRIES

Please follow the general style guidelines above.

For single-book contributions that only reference the book under scrutiny, simply include page references parenthetically within the text, with just the page number itself ("p," "pg," or "pp" are not necessary). Do not include the author's name, as it already appears in the heading.

For studies of two or more books (and all single reviews that cite beyond the reviewed title), please follow The Chicago Manual of Style's documentation guidelines.

The review should be untitled, with the following information at the top of the piece:
Title (of book in italics)
Author (of book under scrutiny)
Publishing house, year of publication
Number of pages (Example: 280 p.)

SPECIFIC GUIDELINES FOR EXHIBITION REVIEWS

Please follow the general style guidelines above.
Please limit your word count to 1000 words.

The review should be untitled, with the following information at the top of the piece:
Exhibition Name
Name of Museum or Other Location
Date of event (Example: 1 January 2011-3 March 2011)
Curated by Name

SPECIFIC GUIDELINES FOR VISUAL, AUDIO, AND VIDEO SUBMISSIONS

CuiZine features animation, cartoon, or image-based essays with Canadian content or by Canadian artists. We also welcome audio and video submissions.

Please send us your work in the following file formats: URL, PDF, JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, DOC, DOCX, RTF.

Please submit images in one of the following file formats: JPEG, PNG, GIF, or BMP. We prefer not to receive PDF or DOC files with images only or files such as EPS, AI, or TIFF. The ideal image resolution is 150 dpi. Please do not send us images under 72 dpi.

You can introduce your work in a short abstract, as we do not publish figure/artwork captions for original creative submissions.

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